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How to Import a CSV in Snowflake in Snowflake

Snowflake allows you to upload a CSV file from your local machines that run on Windows, Linux, or MacOS.

This tutorial will show you how to upload a CSV file from all three platforms to a Snowflake database table.

In this example, the CSV file to be imported is called Enterprises. It contains three columns (id, name, and location), is located in "test" folder of our local machine, and has the following structure:

 1,Microsoft,Washington    
 2,Apple,California
 3,IBM,New York  
 ...

Steps:

  1. Create a Snowflake stage
create or replace stage enterprises_stage;
  1. Create a file format using the FILE FORMAT command to describe the format of the file to be imported
create or replace file format enterprises_format type = 'csv' field_delimiter = ',';
  1. Upload your CSV file from local folder to a Snowflake stage using the PUT command
-- this step can not be performed by running the command from the Worksheets page on the Snowflake web interface. You'll need to install and use SnowSQL client to do this 

-- Windows
put file://C:\test\Enterprises.csv @enterprises_stage;

-- Linux/Mac
put file:///tmp/data/Enterprises.csv @enterprises_stage;
  1. Check to see if the Snowflake stage is populated with the data from the file
select 
  c.$1, 
  c.$2, 
  c.$3 
from @enterprises_stage (file_format => enterprises_format) c;
  1. You need to create a table within Snowflake database that has the same structure as the CSV file we want to import prior to running the COPY INTO command.
create or replace table enterprises (
  id integer, 
  name varchar (100),  
  location varchar(100)
)
  1. Load data from a Snowflake stage into a Snowflake database table using a COPY INTO command
-- load data as it is organized in a CSV file
copy into test.enterprises from @enterprises_stage;

-- if you want to filter out data from a stage and import only particular columns
copy into test.enterprises from (select c.$1, c.$2 from @enterprises_stage (file_format => enterprises_format) c);
  1. Check to see if the Snowflake database table is populated with the data
select * from enterprises;

      id    | name        | location 
------------+-------------+---------------
 1          | Microsoft   | Washington    
 2          | Apple       | California
 3          | IBM         | New York  

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